Tuesday, 13 August 2013

The War on Terror

The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism is a phrase usually applied to an international military movement which started because of the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. This resulted in an international military campaign to do away with al-Qaeda and other militant organizations. The United Kingdom and many other NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and non-NATO nations take part in the conflict.

The term ‘War On Terror’ was initially used by U.S President George W. Bush on 20 September 2001. The Bush administration and the Western media have ever since employed the term to indicate a global military, political, lawful, and conceptual struggle – targeting both organizations designated as terrorist and authorities accused of supporting them. It was normally used with a particular focus on militant Islamists, al-Qaeda, and other Jihadi groups.

Tuesday, 12 March 2013

War on Terror

The War on Terror is a term commonly applied to an international military campaign which started as a result of the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. This resulted in an international military campaign to eliminate al-Qaeda and other militant organizations. The United Kingdom and many other NATO and non-NATO nations participated in the conflict. The phrase 'War on Terror' was first used by US President George W. Bush on 20 September 2001. The Bush administration and the Western media have since used the term to signify a global military, political, lawful, and conceptual struggle targeting both organizations designated as terrorist and regimes accused of supporting them. It was typically used with a particular focus on militant Islamists and al-Qaeda. Although the term is not officially used by the administration of US President Barack Obama, it is still commonly used by politicians, in the media and by some aspects of government officially, such as the United States' Global War on Terrorism Service Medal.

Thursday, 3 May 2012

Wallaby

Very small forest-dwelling wallabies are known as "pademelons" (genus Thylogale) and "dorcopsises" (genera Dorcopsis and Dorcopsulus). The name "wallaby" comes from the Eora, who were the first human inhabitants of the Sydney area. Young wallabies are known as "joeys", like many other marsupials. Adult male wallabies are referred to as "bucks", "boomers", or "jacks". An adult female wallaby is known as a "doe", "flyer", or "jill". A group of wallabies is called a "court", "mob", or "troup". Although members of most wallaby species are small, some can grow up to six feet in length (from head to tail).

Wallabies are herbivores whose diet consists of a wide range of grasses, vegetables, leaves, and other foliage. Due to recent urbanization, many wallabies now feed in rural and urban areas. Wallabies cover vast distances for food and water, which is often scarce in their environment. Mobs of wallabies often congregate around the same water hole during the dry season.

Wallabies face several threats. Wild dogs, foxes, and feral cats are among the predators wallabies face. A wallaby utilizes its powerful hind leg to fend off predators. Their powerful legs are not only used for bounding at high speeds and jumping great heights, but can also be used to administer powerful kicks to potential predators. Wallabies also have a powerful tail that is used mostly for balance and support. Humans also pose a significant threat to wallabies due to increased interaction. Many wallabies have been involved in vehicular accidents as they often feed near roads and urban areas.

Tuesday, 20 December 2005

Democratization or the War on Terror?

Giving us an insight into what Middle East democratization really means, the EU foreign policy chief, Javier Solana, warned that aid to the Palestinian Authority might be cut if Hamas make further gains in the upcoming parliamentary elections. The same concerns were heard in the US House of Representatives Friday. How is this making Middle East governments more accountable to their own people?

And what would it mean if Hamas won anyway? In this excellent contribution to the now sadly defunct Middle East International, veteran correspondent Graham Usher charts the movement's gradual drift toward the center.